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Film Review of The Week – The Grand Budapest Hotel (2014)

The Grand Budapest Hotel is my favourite film of all time it's colourful, charming and energetic and I love Wes Anderson films. Wes Anderson brings to life the fictional Republic of Zubrowka, with candy colours and

the grand budapest hotel film review of the week

The Grand Budapest Hotel is my favourite film of all time it’s colourful, charming and energetic and I love Wes Anderson films.

Wes Anderson brings to life the fictional Republic of Zubrowka, with candy colours and an endearing, yet dark requiem of a story line. With an amazing cast, including familiar faces of many Anderson movies, Bill Murray and Owen Wilson, it is no doubt that The Grand Budapest Hotel won a grand total of 5 awards at the Baftas 2015.

The Grand Budapest Hotel tells the story of an illustrious concierge Gustave H (Ralph Fiennes) and his lobby boy Zero Moustafa (Tony Revolori), who are working at The Grand Budapest, a famous and popular European hotel in all its glory, 1932. At the death of one of the hotels ‘most valued and distinguished guests’, Madame D, (Tilda Swinton) an adventure begins with the fight for her hefty inheritance including that of the valuable and ‘cherished painting’ ‘Boy With Apple’. Mme. D’s villainous family (Adrien Brody & William Defoe), whom are very dark and sharp characters, and will do anything to retrieve the painting that’s left in Gustave’s name, all the while Gustave fighting to clear his name of the murder of Madame D.

Ralph Fiennes delivers an impeccable performance as the dandy Gustave. Fiennes projects a big-hearted, well-respected character with a light and comical presence, differing from his, usually, serious appearances. We see his kindness through his friendship with Zero and the strengths he goes to, to protect him. From his brilliant vocabulary to his immaculate moustache, there’s nothing not to like about Gustave H.  

Notorious for his distinctive visual and narrative style, Wes Anderson, plays with fanciful camera movements accompanied by a lively score that none other than fits perfectly with the zippy plot. This fast-paced comedy is also filled with grief, loss, rivalry and unlikely friendships, (very typically Anderson). His classic use of flat space camera shots, snap-zooms and slow motion along with his vivid colour palette, Anderson gives The Grand Budapest Hotel a fun and exhilarating drive that pulls the audience in. With the many flamboyant and fun story lines and plots, that are neatly packed in, like a Mendl’s cream cake in it’s ribbon tied box, amongst underlining influences of murder and other corrupt escapades, Anderson delivers another gem. 

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hannah@theblackandwhiteedit.co.uk

Review overview
1 COMMENT
  • Caroline 26th January 2016

    Good review Hannah. I watched this film a while back & loved it though I’m not sure I had a clue what was going on half the time, so you’ve cleared that up, I know what it’s about now. I want to watch it again!

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