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Book Review Of The Week: The Girl On The Train

The Girl On The Train is a thriller written by Paula Hawkins and has you hooked from page one! The Girl On The Train is (believe it or not) about a girl on a train,

the girl on the train book review

The Girl On The Train is a thriller written by Paula Hawkins and has you hooked from page one! The Girl On The Train is (believe it or not) about a girl on a train, Rachel, who is our main protagonist. Rachel is a drunk. She gets the same train in to London every single morning and every single evening. She looks up at the same time, every day at the same stop and sees the same young, happy couple every day, Jason and Jess, not their real names, but the names Rachel has given them in the fictitious world that she has created surrounding them. However, not all is as it seems. Rachel witnesses something one morning that she feels the need to put right. One morning it is announced that Jess, who’s real name is Megan, has went missing and Rachel feels she may be the only one who knows what’s happened. Her drunken self seems to remember very little and her memories are distorted versions of the truth. The novel follows weather Rachel can help figure out what happened, but within that she finds out more about her past than what she thought she knew.

Throughout the book Paula Hawkins will change over the perspective of the narrator and we will hear from different sides of the characters of what is happening and their versions of the truth, this is gripping as a reader as you feel you’re just about to get somewhere with Rachel (for example) when, suddenly, the narrator is now Megan, and you’re literally on the edge of your seat thinking that all is going to be revealed and BAM! it’s Rachel again. The narration swoops in and out like this which adds the suspense to the storyline and you simply cannot put the book down. Often when Rachel is narrating the story can become blurred and confusing and I love this that it shows a state of Rachel’s mental condition and though it could of made the novel look sloppy, it does quite the opposite and adds complexity to the narrative and makes the book a masterpiece.

The characters are depicted brilliantly and you really get a feel for the characters and can relate to each one. Like I have mentioned, the complexity of the novel comes from Rachel’s constant drunk state, and when she’s sober, her narrating becomes more clear and it’s like you’re on the journey with Rachel. It’s a truly gripping novel and has been widely popular and was No.1 in The New York Times Fiction Bestsellers 2015 and has won the Goodreads Choice Awards Best Mystery and Thriller. I don’t know why it took me so long to jump on the band wagon, but I’m SO glad I did, and if you haven’t read it yet I’m passing the recommendations on to you. It would make a thrilling BBC drama…

 

hannah@theblackandwhiteedit.co.uk

Review overview
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